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Departments > Water > 2019 Consumer Confidence Report

2019 Water Quality Report

2019 CCR

2019 Water Quality Report GEORGETOWN WATER DEPARTMENT 37 The Circle, Georgetown, Delaware 19947 PWS ID# DE0000592 June 4, 2019

We are pleased to present this year's Annual Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report) as required by the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). This report is designed to provide details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. This report is a snapshot of last year's water quality. We are committed to providing you with this information because informed customers are our best allies.

Spanish (Espanol): Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre la calidad de su agua beber. Traduscalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Where does my water come from?

Your water is groundwater that comes from the Manokin and Columbia Aquifer.

Source water assessment and availability

Our source water assessment is available through: http://delawaresourcewater.org/assessments/

The Source Water Assessment’s Summary of Our System’s Susceptibility to Contamination

Overall, Georgetown Water has a moderate susceptibility to nutrients, a moderate susceptibility to pathogens, a very high susceptibility to petroleum hydrocarbons, a moderate susceptibility to pesticides, a moderate susceptibility to PCBs, a very high susceptibility to other organic compounds, a moderate susceptibility to metals and, a moderate susceptibility to other inorganic compounds.

Why are there contaminants in my drinking water?

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Safe Drinking Water Hotline, 800-426-4791.

The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.

How can I get involved?

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact William Bradley at 302-856-6045 or 302-236-2647. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend the Georgetown Water Department monthly Town Council meeting the 2nd & 4th Wednesday of each month.

Additional information about lead

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Georgetown Water Department is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When

your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead

Violations:

2018 – MCL, SINGLE SAMPLE PH EXCEEDANCE – We encountered an MCL, single sample PH exceedance violation and compliance was achieved 05-07-2018.

For more information, contact:

William Bradley 37 The Circle Georgetown, DE 19947 (302) 856-6045 or (302) 236-2647

Water Quality Data Tables

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the calendar year of this report. Although many more contaminants were tested, only those substances listed below were found in your water. All sources of drinking water contain some naturally occurring contaminants. At low levels, these substances are generally not harmful in our drinking water. Removing all contaminants would be extremely expensive, and in most cases, would not provide increased protection of public health. A few naturally occurring minerals may actually improve the taste of drinking water and have nutritional value at low levels. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done in the calendar year of the report. The EPA or the State requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not vary significantly from year to year, or the system is not considered vulnerable to this type of contamination. As such, some of our data, though representative, may be more than one year old. In this table you will find terms and abbreviations that might not be familiar to you. To help you better understand these terms, we have provided the definitions below the table.

Table of Regulated Contaminants Lead and Copper

Units

MCLG

AL

90th

Percentile

# sites over AL

Sample Date

Violation

Typical Source of Contamination

Copper

ppm

1.3

1.3

0.22

1

2017

N

Erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives; corrosion of household plumbing system

Regulated Contaminants

Units

MCLG

MCL

Highest Level

Range

Sample Date

Violation

Typical Source of Contamination

Haloacetic acids (HAA5)

ppb

No goal for the total

60

2

2.268-2.5

2018

N

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Chlorine

ppm

MRDLG=4

MRDL=4

0.8

0.7-0.8

2018

N

Water additive used to control microbes

Barium

ppm

2

2

0.094

0.094-0.094

2018

N

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Total Trihalomethanes

(TTHM)

ppb

No goal for the total

80

3

2.39-3.92

2018

N

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Fluoride

ppm

2

2

1.1

0-1.1

2018

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen)

ppm

10

10

4

3.351-4.5

2018

N

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Selenium

ppb

50

50

0.8

0.8-0.8

2018

N

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines

 

Delaware Secondary Drinking Water Standards

Contaminants

State SMCL

Average

Range

Alkalinity

n/a

46.30

35.80-54.60

Chloride

250 ppm

16.96

14.08-27.10

pH

6.5 – 8.5

7

7

Sodium

n/a

30.22

29.38-31.10

Sulfate

250 ppm

17.94

11.00-33.63

 

Definitions Unit Descriptions

Term

Definition

ppm

ppm: parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/L)

ppb

ppb: parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (μg/L)

NA

NA: not applicable

ND

ND: Not detected

NR

NR: Monitoring not required, but recommended.

Important Drinking Water Definitions

Term

Definition

MCLG

MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

MCL

MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

SMCL

SMCL: Suggested Maximum Contaminant Level for aesthetic contaminants.

TT

TT: Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

AL

AL: Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

MRDLG

MRDLG: Maximum residual disinfection level goal. The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

MRDL

MRDL: Maximum residual disinfectant level. The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

 

We, at Georgetown Water Department, work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children’s future.

This CCR Report was prepared in collaboration with Delaware Rural Water Association and Georgetown Water Department.

 

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